Review: The Four Symbols (Sacred Grounds) by Giacometti & Ravenne

Hey everyone!
Today, I am sharing my review of The Four Symbols (Sacred Grounds) by Giacometti & Ravenne with you all.


Title: The Four Symbols (Sacred Grounds)
Author: The Four Symbols
Release Date: 2nd April 2020
Page Count: 400
Publisher: Hodder & Stoughton
Buy It Here (affiliate links): Amazon UKWaterstones

GoodReads Synopsis:

In a Europe on the verge of Collapse, the Nazi organization Ahernebe is pillaging sacred landmarks across the world. Their aim is to collect treasures with occult powers, which will help them establish the Third Reich. The organization’s head, Himmler, has sent SS officers to search a Tibetan sanctuary in a forgotten valley in the Himalayas, whilst he travels to a monastery in Spain, to find a mysterious painting. Which ancient power do the Nazis believe they hold the key to?

Meanwhile, in London, Churchill has discovered that the war against Germany will also be a spiritual one: their light must the occult if they are to win…


My Review:

I had The Four Symbols (Sacred Grounds) on my NetGalley shelf for a lot longer than I would like to admit, but I finally got around to reading it a couple of months ago. If I’m honest, it wasn’t quite what I was expecting.

To begin with, I felt that the story jumped around a little too much, and it made it confusing, and difficult to follow at times. We were introduced to a lot of different characters, in a lot of different places, doing lots of very different things. However, I was still enjoying each part individually, and all of the pieces did eventually fall in to place, and come together.

The book as a whole does evoke a lot of feeling, but I didn’t find myself getting attached to any particular character. But the majority of the main characters in the story are awful people (most of them are Nazi’s), so of course the only feeling I felt towards them was hatred. It was interesting to read a book where the Nazi’s were actually the main characters though, as I don’t think I’ve ever read anything where that has been the case before (apart from maybe The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas).

The actual storyline was really enjoyable, and it would be interesting to find out how much of it was based on real life events. I’m extremely interested in history, especially WWII, but I’ve never heard of a lot of the missions and events in this book, so is it entirely fabricated? Or is it based on some real truth that I just haven’t heard about before? It does include a lot of characters that were real people, and who played major parts of WWII. It’s definitely something I am going to look in to more.

Overall, I did enjoy this book, but not as much as I had anticipated. There are definitely some interesting areas of the story that can be explored more, which I am hoping will happen in the sequel, Good & Evil, which I plan on reading soon.

I give The Four Symbols (Sacred Grounds) a 3.5 star rating!

A huge thank you to NetGalley and Hodder & Stoughton for providing me with an ARC, in exchange for an honest review.


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2 thoughts on “Review: The Four Symbols (Sacred Grounds) by Giacometti & Ravenne

Add yours

  1. This sounds quite good actually! I am also fascinated by WW2 and I love to read books about it or that are based on it. I don’t think I’ve ever read one where the Nazis are the main characters either so I am very intrigued!

    Liked by 1 person

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